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Ape Caves

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Ariel Dam, 1,343 feet in length and 313 deep, stretches across the western end of Lake Merwin, an artificial body of water created by the Northwest Electric Company as the first unit of a huge power-development program. Within the darn is a fish-preservation apparatus designed and operated by the State Department of Fisheries. A ten-ton steel tank containing water imprisons the fish as they come up the river. When the...

Learn more about Ariel

Mile: 44

The bridge was built in 1945 and is one of the few concrete bridges built during that period. Labor and materials were scarce during World War II, and its construction is a testament to the importance of this bridge, which provided access to vital timber reserves for the war effort. At 308 feet in length, it features a 199-foot open spandrel rib-type reinforced concrete deck arch.

Learn more about Jim Creek Bridge

Mile: 40

A starting point for trips eastward into the Lewis River area. The Lewis River Ranger Station was established sometime before 1910 near the homestead of Ole Peterson, about three miles east of the community of Cougar. Peterson was a trapper and fur trader, probably working for the Hudson’s Bay Company, who set up his homestead in the early 1890s at Cougar Flats on the Upper Lewis River. The Lewis River...

Learn more about Ole Peterson’s Camp

Mile: 40

Created by the volcanic forces that once rent that section. The largest of the caves extend about one mile under the mountain to an opening on another face. The caves contain no stalactites or stalagmites, as the formation is lava, not limestone. Flashlights or lanterns should be used when entering them, and tourists should be accompanied by someone familiar with the caves. Sturdy, thick-soled shoes and other suitable clothing should...

Learn more about Ape Caves