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Oakville

Once a campsite of the Chehalis Tribe, is now a small, quiet farming center divided by the highway. By the 1940s the town featured a bank, a weekly paper, a creamery, and two tie-cutting mills. Cascara bark, gathered in the adjoining forests, was shipped in considerable quantities every year.

Today Oakville is still a small community, but with a lot of personality. The town’s dairy farms, prize-winning cattle, herds of llama, American buffalo and horses make for interesting family outings. Paved and winding country roads have made bicycle touring and camping popular here. Off-road cyclists will find Capitol Forest’s trails challenging.

Points of Interest Points of Interest icon

Oakville State Bank

Located in the center of town, this was the only commercial banking facility in the community for over 40 years. It was built in 1910 and was robbed three different times. The last robbery was reportedly the last by horseback in the country.

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