Search

Cultural History Pages:

Search for a tour by category:

Search site:

Saint John

This 88-mile trip features a former prosperous shipping and marketing railroad town, plus several grand barns brimming with local history.

Heart icon

Like what you see? Want to share it?

Crosshair icon

Clicking a crosshair will take you to that location on the map.

George Washington icon

Start or the end of a tour leg.

Map marker icon

Waypoint or town along the tour leg with more information.

Star icon

Key waypoints and Main Street communities along the tour leg. Sites you do not want to miss!

Point of interest icon

Point of interest along the tour leg.

Danish immigrant Nels Eriksen leased property in 1907, and married Bessie Rhoads, the same year. In 1910, they brought the property and built a combination machine shed, shop, hog shelter. In 1911, they built a house and, in 1915, they built a horse barn. Two-thirds of the barn’s main floor had horse stalls and the other one-third comprised of an alleyway that contained the stairwell into the haymow, a box...

Learn more about Eriksen Barn

Mile: 18

The town sprawls along the track of the Chicago, Milwaukee, St. Paul and Pacific Railroad. For a number of years Kamiakin, the Yakima chief who in the fifties took a leading part in the resistance to the white settlers, lived here. In 1861, urged by his homesick wife, he returned to Washington from voluntary exile among the Crow Native Americans. Eventually, Kamiakin was crowded off his farm, and about 1880...

Learn more about Ewan

Mile: 22

The William Cook barn and house were built in 1917. From 1917 until 1930, when tractors replaced the horses, the barn was used entirely as a horse barn and had four milking parlors for dairy cows. In the 1940s, when farmers updated their harvesters from sacks to bulk, an elevator was built inside the barn which had a capacity of about 7,000 bushels. The barn was originally built to store...

Learn more about Cook Barn

Mile: 29

Named for General John W. Sprague, director of the Northern Pacific Railway. The town is laid out at a 45-degree angle to the highway, as are most of the towns on this route, with the business section comprising a few blocks along First Street. On a gentle slope are a residence district, the high school, and grade school. The residential area still contains some unique turn of the 20th century...

Learn more about Sprague
Points of Interest
Point of interest icon

Mary Queen of Heaven Roman Catholic Church