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Agriculture

Evidence of agriculture is visible all across the Evergreen State. Agricultural buildings and fields and their relationship to transportation routes illustrate how farmers acclimated to the region’s climate and topography. Vast fields of wheat, dotted with barns, grain silos, farmhouses, and the occasional schoolhouse dot the landscape of eastern Washington. Railroad tracks lead to silos, often run by a cooperative of local farmers, showing how farmers got their goods to market. Cattle and sheep ranching occur in the areas of the state with a drier climate—the highlands of the Okanagan, Snake, Yakima, and Spokane valleys. Smaller truck farms, growing fruits and vegetables, are closer in to the urban centers of Seattle, Tacoma, Spokane, Walla Walla, Yakima, and the Tri-Cities. Historically dairying, poultry, and bulb and berry farms were located in Western Washington counties, benefiting from increased rainfall and greater access to city markets, like Pike Place Market in Seattle.

Davenport to Ellensburg (Tour)

Large, well-cultivated farms alternate with stretches of uninhabited range; at widely spaced intervals small towns, ganglia of settlement, are strung along the highway. Travel through large, well-cultivated farms alternating with stretches of uninhabited range and dots of small towns.

Davenport to Ellensburg (Tour Leg)

Large, well-cultivated farms alternate with stretches of uninhabited range; at widely spaced intervals small towns, ganglia of settlement, are strung along the highway. Travel through large, well-cultivated farms alternating with stretches of uninhabited range and dots of small towns.